Tag: Starting Business in India

How GST impact the wallet of common man

gst-700x300-1.jpgSince the passing of the GST Constitutional Bill by the Rajya Sabha in August last year, the country has been preparing itself for the new tax regime. The new GST law is India?s biggest tax reform initiative which is expected to improve compliance levels, increase government revenue in company registration in India and create a common playing field for businesses by amalgamating a host of central and local taxes.

On the face of it, GST seems to be a mixed bag with some of the necessities becoming cheaper, while the others might get more expensive. While in the longer run the Goods and Service Tax might have a favorable effect on most of the sectors of the economy, in the short run, as with the most of the reforms, the benefits seem to be limited. Based on the experience of GST implementation in other countries, India could observe an inflationary impact at the onset of the reform, which might fade away once the legislation sinks in.

The present rate of service tax is 15 percent and is applicable to most of the services, excluding essential ones like cultural activities, ambulance services, and certain pilgrimages and sports events. Under Goods and Service Tax, this rate would increase to 18 percent making the services more costly. For some goods like edible oil, textiles, etc. the excise duty is nil and the VAT in several states is 5 percent. Hence, the total cost of such goods is close to 8%-9%. With GST, the cost of such goods is likely to increase and this might put a hole in the budget of a common man to wholly owned subsidiary in India.

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Foreign Direct Investment (FDI)

India has already marked its presence as one of the fastest growing economies of the world. It has been ranked among the top 10 attractive destinations for inbound investments. Since 1991, the regulatory environment in terms of foreign investment has been consistently eased to make it investor-friendly.

The measures taken by the Government are directed to open new sectors for foreign direct investment, increase the sectoral limit of existing sectors and simplifying other conditions of the FDI policy. FDI policy reforms are meant to provide ease of doing business and accelerate the pace of foreign investment in the country.

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI)

FDI because the name suggests, it’s associate degree investment directly created by a remote company into business in another country. Such investment may well be either within the kind of business enlargement in another country or may well be a results of acquisition of the corporate.

Company formation in India

Direct Foreign investments in India approval were introduced by the then Finance Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh in 1991 under Foreign Exchange Management Act to promote such investments thereby increasing supply of domestic capital & increase the economic growth.

As per Foreign Exchange Management Act, ‘FDI’ means investment by non-resident entity/person resident outside India in the capital of an Indian company under Schedule 1 of Foreign Exchange Management (Transfer or Issue of Security by a Person Resident Outside India) Regulations 2000.

Advantages of FDI in India

There are several benefits of increasing foreign direct investment in India. First of all, with more FDI, consumers will be able to save 5 to 10 percent on their expenses because products will be available at much less rates and to top it all, the quality will be better as well. In short, it will be a win-win situation for the buyers. It is also expected that the farmers who face a lot of economic problems will also get better payment for their produce. This is a major benefit considering how many farmers have been giving up their lives lately. It is expected that their earnings will increase by 10 to 30 percent.

FDI is also supposed to have a positive effect on the employment scenario by generating approximately 4 million job opportunities. Areas like logistics will be benefited as well because of FDI and it is assumed that 6 million jobs will be created. The governments – both central and state – will be benefited because of FDI. An addition of 25-30 billion dollars to the national treasury is also expected. This is a substantial amount and can really play a major role in the development of Indian economy in the long term.

Steps Taken by Government to Promote FDI

The Indian Government has taken a number of steps to show its willingness to allow more foreign direct investment in the country. In the infrastructure development sector, it has relaxed the norms pertaining to area restriction, the laws regarding gaining a comfortable exit from a particular project and the requirements relating to minimum capitalization. If companies are ready to commit 30 percent of their investments for affordable housing, then the rules for minimum capitalization and area restriction will be waived off. It is expected that this will benefit the construction sector a lot, especially in the form of greater investment inflow.

The Indian Ministry of Finance has also proposed that 100 percent FDI will be allowed in railways-related infrastructure. However, this does not include the operational aspects. While it is true that the foreign investors will not be allowed to intervene in railway operations, they will be able to provide for high-speed trains, such as bullet train, and enhance the overall network in the process.

Who can invest in India?

  •  A Non-resident entity means a person resident outside India.
  • Non Resident Indian or Person of Indian Origin (PIO holder) or Overseas Citizen of India (OCI holder).
  • A body corporate means a company incorporated outside India.
  • Foreign Institutional Investor (FII) means an entity established or incorporated outside India which proposes to make investment in India and which is registered as a FII in accordance with the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) (Foreign Institutional Investor) Regulations 1995..
  • Foreign Venture Capital Investor (FVCI) means an investor incorporated and established outside India, which is registered under the Securities and Exchange Board of India.

Original Source : http://ajsh.in/blog/foreign-direct-investment-fdi/

How To Register A Trademark In India

trademark-690

When an outsider looks for startup business, the first thing they notice is the trademark. A trademark is the identity of a business lies. It is the name and symbol under which a business undertakes its trade and commerce, which represents the company.

In India, trademarks are regulated by the Trade Marks Act of 1999. The Act aims to provide registration and better protection towards trademarks while preventing the use of fraudulent marks.

How to Choose a “Good” Trademark

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The mark(s) should be easy to remember.

It should be short and easy to spell and write.

It may be aesthetically appealing.

It should not ideally be descriptive in its nature.

It can be fanciful and coined, to avoid confusion.

“APPLE/ASUS/DELL/HP/LENOVO” for computers are an example of a non-descriptive and arbitrary mark, which makes for good trademarks.

“KODAK” for cameras is a coined term; that also makes a good trademark.

“MICROSOFT” for software, “LAKME/AMWAY/AVON” for makeup, are all good examples.

How to Apply For a Trademark?

Conduct a trademark search that will let you know if there are similar trademarks that are already registered.

Apply for a trademark registration. You can do this by yourself through the Government website, or get a lawyer to do it for you. The procedure of application is laid down in the Trade Marks Act, 1999.

An application number is allotted for every pending registration, which can be tracked on the website.

If the application is accepted, it will be published in the Trademark Journal. If there are no oppositions, your trademark will be registered to you. However, if there are oppositions, there will be a hearing in the Trademark Hearing Office to decide on the final registration of the mark.

Benefits of Registering Your Trademark

A registered trademark identifies and advertises the good/service.

It protects the commercial goodwill of the trader/owner of the trademark.

It protects consumers from buying forged or inferior goods.

In the case of an infringement of a registered trademark, the owner has the option of civil and criminal remedies. In the case of an unregistered trademark, the only remedy available to the owner is the option of filing a suit of passing off.

In India, it is not compulsory to register a trademark. However, there are certain obvious benefits of registration of the same. The benefits are enumerated as above: